Participation in Clinical Trials High Among Cancer Survivors Who Self-identify as Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual

AACR: October 29, 2012


SAN DIEGO — Cancer survivors who self-identified as being lesbian, gay or bisexual were more than twice as likely as heterosexual cancer survivors to have participated in cancer clinical trials, according to data from a small study presented at the Fifth AACR Conference on The Science of Cancer Health Disparities, held here Oct. 27-30, 2012.

“The data from which our findings were derived were incredibly limited. We have to interpret these data cautiously,” said Jennifer M. Jabson, M.P.H., Ph.D., a postdoctoral research fellow in the department of community health sciences at Boston University School of Public Health.

In 2011, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) issued a report titled “The Health of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender People: Building a Foundation for Better Understanding,” in which it identified this community as medically underserved. Jabson and colleagues studied the representation of the lesbian, gay and bisexual community in cancer clinical trials to add to existing knowledge about their experience with cancer and their participation in the clinical trial system.  Read more