Preliminary Results from America’s Churning Races: Race and Ethnic Response Changes Between Census 2000 and the 2010 Census

Census: June 12, 2014

At the 2014 Population Association of America meetings (May 1-3), we presented preliminary results of research (authored by Carolyn Liebler, Sonya Rastogi, Leticia Fernandez, James Noon, and Sharon Ennis) examining patterns of race and Hispanic origin response change at the individual level between Census 2000 and the 2010 Census.

Our research, America’s Churning Races: Race and Ethnic Response Changes Between Census 2000 and the 2010 Census, measures the extent of these changes.

Our preliminary findings have generated a lot of interest, and we are taking this opportunity to clarify what we have found so far.

Previous research (see references in abstract) suggests that responses to questions of race and Hispanic origin can change over time or across contexts for a variety of reasons, including life experiences, changing social forces, a change in who is reporting the race/Hispanic origin, or questionnaire design. The race and Hispanic origin response changes that we observe from 2000 to 2010 may be influenced by many of these factors, and some groups may be differentially impacted by questionnaire design changes from Census 2000 to the 2010 Census. Read More